The Poor People’s Campaign has started again, 50 years later. We’re in.

Updated 5/23/18

This is not one of our normal daily calls-to-action…

This is both a history lesson and a connection that we have to a campaign that started 50 years ago.  Every time we call our legislators or go to a City Council meeting to fight some form of injusticeevery action we’ve participated in for the Trump Resistance, such as the Women’s March, the March for Our Lives, Citizenship Fairs, political postcard parties, environmental rallies and DACA clinics, we have been connecting with the values of the Poor People’s Campaign. We are standing together to challenge Trumpism and the power of the 1% – and indeed “transform the political, economic and moral structures of our society.”

Continue reading “The Poor People’s Campaign has started again, 50 years later. We’re in.”

Mon. – 4/30 – Last day for this action.

(4/30 deadline) – The Beaufort Sea needs to remain off-limits.

Currently at 8,867 comments, up from 40 comments last week! Come on, fellow resisters – let’s put this on the map!

Oil companies don’t behave well, even when they’re close to home…
Here’s a interesting point of comparison… Oil companies drilling in off CA, including in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, have had nearly 400 violations since 2015! From failed and missing tests, to spilling 120,000 gallons of crude oil, oil companies prove daily that they are not trustworthy partners.

Can we trust them in the isolation of the far north? No, of course not.
In Dec. of 2016,  Obama said that the  Beaufort Sea and the entire Chukchi Sea was off-limits to drilling per “the scientific assessment that, even with the high safety standards that both our countries have put in place, the risks of an oil spill in this region are significant and our ability to clean up from a spill in the region’s harsh conditions is limited. By contrast, it would take decades to fully develop the production infrastructure necessary for any large-scale oil and gas leasing production in the region—at a time when we need to continue to move decisively away from fossil fuels.”

Trump don’t care. His administration is proposing to resume leasing areas of Alaska’s Beaufort Sea to oil drilling as soon as next year. Tell him to leave the Beaufort Sea off-limits!

Comment here by Apr 30, 2018 11:59 PM ET. Continue reading “Mon. – 4/30 – Last day for this action.”

Mon. – 4/30 – 3 quick environmental actions

Coal-Ash disaster from lingers in Tennessee as regulation fight rages. People continue to die of the health effects to this day. In 2008, a 5.4-million-cubic-yard torrent from a coal ash slurry-filled pond choked waterways and created a moonscape of mounds residents dubbed ‘ashbergs.’ Photographer: Wade Payne/Bloomberg via Getty Images

1. Deadline is TODAY, April 30th. – Don’t Weaken Coal Ash Disposal Regulations.

coal ash

Scott Pruitt is proposing to weakening the Coal Combustion Residuals rules that safeguard communities from coal ash contamination.  A toxic by-product of coal burning power plants, coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other contaminants, and its disposal was regulated in 2015 by the EPA to reduce health and environmental risks to communities. But at the behest of the utility industry, the Trump Administration has proposed the first of two rules that would weaken the essential protections that those EPA rules provide.

Deadline for comments is TODAY April 30th.  Comment to EPA here, by 11:59 PM ET.  Continue reading “Mon. – 4/30 – 3 quick environmental actions”

Tues – 4/17 – Bookmark this – Environmental comments and calls!

However, these kids are schooling them now.

eco watch

A trial date, Oct. 29th, has been set for the Kids’ Climate Lawsuit! (EcoWatch). If you haven’t been following this, 21 plaintiffs between the ages of 8 and 19 are suing our government, alleging that their constitutional and public trust rights are being violated by the government’s creation of a national energy system that causes dangerous climate change.

But we need to do our part. Make your calls! Make your comments!

Continue reading “Tues – 4/17 – Bookmark this – Environmental comments and calls!”

Tues. 4/3 – Part 2 – Comment now on the BLM’s proposed “land use” plans, due 4/11 and 4/13.

The Valley of the Gods was included in Bears Ears but not in Shash Jáa. | Photo courtesy of the Bureau of Land Management

You’re saying, “Hey, didn’t we just comment on this? Why are we having to comment AGAIN?” Let’s take a quick moment to review.

Native Americans spent years campaigning to protect Bears Ears, a distinctive site where Navajo believe their people rose from the earth. A coalition first tried congressional initiatives, which were blocked or ignored. They then appealed directly to Obama and then- Interior Secretary Sally Jewel, using the “Antiquities Act“. On December 28, 2016, President Obama designated 1.4 million acres containing ancient cliff dwellings and an estimated 100,000 archaeological sites as “Bears Ears National Monument”.

Grand Staircase/Escalante, designated as a national monument in 1996, is a 1.9 million acres area rich in unique rock formation scientific, ecological, and paleontological resources.

Unfortunately, all these treasures are sitting on top of the country’s largest coal deposits. And uranium. And oil.

Continue reading “Tues. 4/3 – Part 2 – Comment now on the BLM’s proposed “land use” plans, due 4/11 and 4/13.”

Tues. 4/3 – Part 1 – Say “NO” three times.

“Together, we will usher in a bright new future of wonder and wealth.” 

Donald Trump, Dec. 4th, 2017

When Trump destroyed Bears Ears and Grand Staircase/Escalante in favor of the ranching and extractive industries with his heart-monitor signature, he became part of a repeating cycle of American history. A history of genocide of native peoples, of the casual taking and destruction of natural resources, and the disrespect for non-european cultural heritage and science.

What he did on Dec. 4th, however, wasn’t legal. If it were, the three bills proposed by Utah’s GOP congresspeople wouldn’t be necessary. HR 4532 and HR 4558 intends to codify and retroactively legalize Trump’s executive order to reduce Bears Ears National Monument by 85 percent and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument by nearly half. HR 3990 modifies the Antiquities Act to effectively prevent any president from establishing significant national monuments while allowing them to abolish existing monuments with little restriction.

If we all work together, we can stop the three bills that would legitimize this corporate land grab.

Take time this Spring Break week to organize your relatives and friends in red states to inundate their legislators with one simple call to say “NO” three times. Continue reading “Tues. 4/3 – Part 1 – Say “NO” three times.”

Wed. 3/28 – California’s not going back.

LOS ANGELES: Downtown highrise buildings are shown cloaked in dirty air shortly after sunrise September 11, 2002 in Los Angeles, California. Although air quality in Los Angeles has improved in recent decades, smog levels remain among the nation’s worst. Numerous wildfires in the region have also contributed to Los Angeles’ air pollution problem. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

The current administration wants to degrade the protections that keep our water and air clean and our population healthy.

Maybe they think we won’t remember how important these safeguards are, even as we watch the continuing nightmare in Flint, MI, and our own state’s rating as  having the “highest ozone levels” and “worst smog levels” in the country.

So let’s do a quick historical tour of two of our nation’s greatest environmental protection acts. Each one is rooted in tragedies that cost human lives.

Update: (thehill) EPA’s  Scott Pruitt is expected this week to declare that 54.5 mpg standard by 2025 is too strict for the nation’s auto fleet and lower the target, possibly eliminating California’s waiver. CA is committed to reducing its carbon dioxide emissions by 40 percent by 2030, a goal that would be in jeopardy if it cannot hold cars to a high fuel standard.

The Clean Water Act

(alleghenyfront) “June 22, 1969—the day the Cuyahoga River caught fire. In a way, this was nothing new: The river had burned at least a dozen times before, costing millions, and even killing five people.” “It was a river catching fire. I think the rest of the country looked at it and was just—that’s it. That’s over the top. Something has to be done.” – Elaine Marsh, environmental activist

What was done was the passage of the “Clean Water Act“.

Continue reading “Wed. 3/28 – California’s not going back.”