Mon 9/9: One-day notice! Join in to protect your community from oil industry pollution. County Supervisors Meeting Tuesday 9/10.

Actions – Write your supervisors and come to the meeting! 

“Hi indivisible and friends!
Los Padres National Forest is threatened by dangerously under-regulated oil development in Ventura County. We have a rare chance to change that.
On Tuesday, September 10, the Board of Supervisors will consider updating oil permitting to incorporate modern standards that better protect the health and safety of our communities and our environment. The proposed amendments would increase transparency, oversight, and public participation by ensuring that there is an environmental review, public notice, and a hearing before any new oil wells are drilled.

Tues – 10/23: They’re coming for our air. Deadline – Oct. 26.

LOS ANGELES: Downtown highrise buildings are shown cloaked in dirty air shortly after sunrise September 11, 2002 in Los Angeles, California. Although air quality in Los Angeles has improved in recent decades, smog levels remain among the nation’s worst. Numerous wildfires in the region have also contributed to Los Angeles’ air pollution problem. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

While Congress is out, the lights are off in D.C., and our president is distracting us before the election with “scary migrants” and imaginary “middle-class tax cuts”…one type of GOP destruction is continuing to roll off the chutes with machine-like efficiency – the removal of rules protecting us and our environment from the rapacious greed of his new regime.

Action – Stop Trump’s proposed rollback of CA Clean Car Standards – Deadline Oct. 26, (this Friday)  11:59 ET

“There is no safe level of air pollution.” (Newsweek) (BusinessInsider) (LATimes) Continue reading “Tues – 10/23: They’re coming for our air. Deadline – Oct. 26.”

Mon. 4/23 – Deadline TODAY for these comments on our environment!

Illustration from Science – “Evidence builds that dirty air causes Alzheimer’s, dementia”

#1. – LAST DAY (4/23) Dirtier Air Courtesy of Trump’s EPA

The Trump Administration has been determined to rollback and unravel the hard fought for rules protecting our air, water and soil from pollution. With strong support from the oil and fossil fuel industry, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has proposed to withdraw from the Control Techniques Guidelines (CTGs) that assist states in controlling air pollution from the oil and natural gas industry, and trigger related clean air planning requirements in many areas with ozone smog problems.  Withdrawal of these guidelines would mean that, as a practical matter, much uncontrolled or under-controlled oil and gas industry equipment in impacted areas would continue to emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a group of chemicals that react in the atmosphere to form ground-level ozone (smog). Let EPA know we support keeping these guidelines and oppose allowing pollutants to dirty our air.

Deadline for comments to the EPA is TODAY – Monday, April 23.  Comment here.
Read other comments here.

We have been reviewing comments already submitted. There are a number of conservative comments, including letter/attachments from energy companies eager to improve their profit margins, like this one

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So get your comments in right away. They do NOT have to be long. There are currently only 14,642 recorded comments.

Sample Written Script:  Pick some of these points and mix and match. More information on air pollution issues here. If your health or someone you love has health issues from pollution, make it personal. Continue reading “Mon. 4/23 – Deadline TODAY for these comments on our environment!”

Wed. 3/28 – California’s not going back.

LOS ANGELES: Downtown highrise buildings are shown cloaked in dirty air shortly after sunrise September 11, 2002 in Los Angeles, California. Although air quality in Los Angeles has improved in recent decades, smog levels remain among the nation’s worst. Numerous wildfires in the region have also contributed to Los Angeles’ air pollution problem. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

The current administration wants to degrade the protections that keep our water and air clean and our population healthy.

Maybe they think we won’t remember how important these safeguards are, even as we watch the continuing nightmare in Flint, MI, and our own state’s rating as  having the “highest ozone levels” and “worst smog levels” in the country.

So let’s do a quick historical tour of two of our nation’s greatest environmental protection acts. Each one is rooted in tragedies that cost human lives.

Update: (thehill) EPA’s  Scott Pruitt is expected this week to declare that 54.5 mpg standard by 2025 is too strict for the nation’s auto fleet and lower the target, possibly eliminating California’s waiver. CA is committed to reducing its carbon dioxide emissions by 40 percent by 2030, a goal that would be in jeopardy if it cannot hold cars to a high fuel standard.

The Clean Water Act

(alleghenyfront) “June 22, 1969—the day the Cuyahoga River caught fire. In a way, this was nothing new: The river had burned at least a dozen times before, costing millions, and even killing five people.” “It was a river catching fire. I think the rest of the country looked at it and was just—that’s it. That’s over the top. Something has to be done.” – Elaine Marsh, environmental activist

What was done was the passage of the “Clean Water Act“.

Continue reading “Wed. 3/28 – California’s not going back.”